Home > Sewa Day News > Impact Sewa Day 2016 has on Homeless and Food Bank in Bradford
Team of Volunteers at the  Hindu Mandir in Bradford who collected and correctly boxed all the different items.
Sandra from The Curry Project collecting Donations from the Hindu Mandir

Sandra from The Curry Project collecting Donations from the Hindu Mandir

Once again the generous community of Bradford came in their Hundreds to drop of food for the Homeless and Food Bank on Sewa Day 16th Oct 2016. Over 800 food tins, nearly 90 packs of rice and pasta, 150 packs of biscuits, 30 jars of coffee, 36 bags of sugar and much more and over 40 black bin liners full of clothing etc. Sewa Day team have estimated the donation in terms of money to be around £1500.

The following comments were received from Sam Singh of the curry project:
Once again, many thanks to you and your team for the kind donations. We in Bradford are in a situation where homelessness has increased by 30% since 2010, according to the Crisis Homeless Monitoring Team. With the ripple effects of the austerity measures kicking in this figure will only increase in the years to come. The Bradford Curry Project has been helping provide meal to the needy of Bradford for over 30 years; this would not have been possible without the kind donations made by the good people of Bradford taking part in the events such as Sewa Day! We are humbled by your very kind donations of food and clothing, these will help maintain our level of service and possibly increase the service in the coming months – So we like to say a BIG thank you. Many thanks.

On behalf of Bradford Metropolitan Food Bank I would like to thank you for the wonderful donation of food. It was quite amazing that you brought us so much.

Team of Volunteers at the Hindu Mandir in Bradford who collected and correctly boxed all the different items.

Team of Volunteers at the Hindu Mandir in Bradford who collected and correctly boxed all the different items.

In the last year we have helped over 11,000 people who found themselves in difficulty. Immediate help is what these people need and we are able to provide food with the help of people such as yourselves. In the last two years we have helped more and more families. Parents are going without food to give the children whatever they can. The people requiring help come from all religions and nationalities. We pass the food to social workers and other professionals who are able to help with other problems.

We could not manage to help so many were it not for the hard work and kindness of people such as yourselves. Many thanks for your kind support, Frances Atkins Food Coordinator Bfd Met Food Bank